humanrightswatch
newyorker:

Alexis Okeowo writes about how religious and ethnic violence in the Middle Belt has spawned an informal arms industry: http://nyr.kr/18Q14aV
Photographer Ruth McDowall has been documenting the rise of the arms industry and the daily conflict in Nigeria’s Middle Belt. A look at her photos: http://nyr.kr/18Q0TfW
Above: Ohazuma Chima Anthony, thirty-two, recovers at Gwagwalada hospital after the 2011 Christmas Day bombing of St. Theresa’s Catholic Church, in Abuja, Nigeria. Photograph by Ruth McDowall.

newyorker:

Alexis Okeowo writes about how religious and ethnic violence in the Middle Belt has spawned an informal arms industry: http://nyr.kr/18Q14aV

Photographer Ruth McDowall has been documenting the rise of the arms industry and the daily conflict in Nigeria’s Middle Belt. A look at her photos: http://nyr.kr/18Q0TfW

Above: Ohazuma Chima Anthony, thirty-two, recovers at Gwagwalada hospital after the 2011 Christmas Day bombing of St. Theresa’s Catholic Church, in Abuja, Nigeria. Photograph by Ruth McDowall.

post by: Laura López
How big Argentina is?
This map just shows that the total extension of Argentina is equal to 9 European countries approximately.
Argentina is 2,780,400 square kilometres, which makes it the 8th largest country by size and the largest Spanish speaking country in the world. 
Argentina contains 23 provinces and one autonomous city, Buenos Aires and no, it is no overpopulated like India or China. Actually there are just around 40 million people.

post by: Laura López

How big Argentina is?

This map just shows that the total extension of Argentina is equal to 9 European countries approximately.

Argentina is 2,780,400 square kilometres, which makes it the 8th largest country by size and the largest Spanish speaking country in the world.

Argentina contains 23 provinces and one autonomous city, Buenos Aires and no, it is no overpopulated like India or China. Actually there are just around 40 million people.

theatlantic
theatlantic:

No, Iran Doesn’t Need Assad

As opponents of a strike against Syria scramble to find alternative avenues for a peaceful solution, there is one murky diplomatic route, rarely mentioned, which now seems more necessary than ever to explore: talking to Iran.
Contrary to conventional wisdom, Iran’s support for Bashar al-Assad is neither unconditional nor everlasting. Despite having assisted the Assad regime from the beginning of the conflict with weapons and personnel, the war in Syria has not strengthened Iran, which likely wants to get out of the Syrian quagmire as soon as possible — if it can do so with some influence in Syria intact.
First of all, the war has created a regional image problem for the clerics in Tehran. Since its 1979 Islamic Revolution, Iran has strived to be a beacon for the downtrodden people of the Muslim world and a standard-bearer against what it sees as oppression by America in the region. Assad’s carnage against fellow Muslims makes Iran look really bad on the Arab street, where Iran tried hard to make the Arab Spring look like a logical extension of its own revolution.
Read more. [Image: Khaled al-Hariri/Reuters]

theatlantic:

No, Iran Doesn’t Need Assad

As opponents of a strike against Syria scramble to find alternative avenues for a peaceful solution, there is one murky diplomatic route, rarely mentioned, which now seems more necessary than ever to explore: talking to Iran.

Contrary to conventional wisdom, Iran’s support for Bashar al-Assad is neither unconditional nor everlasting. Despite having assisted the Assad regime from the beginning of the conflict with weapons and personnel, the war in Syria has not strengthened Iran, which likely wants to get out of the Syrian quagmire as soon as possible — if it can do so with some influence in Syria intact.

First of all, the war has created a regional image problem for the clerics in Tehran. Since its 1979 Islamic Revolution, Iran has strived to be a beacon for the downtrodden people of the Muslim world and a standard-bearer against what it sees as oppression by America in the region. Assad’s carnage against fellow Muslims makes Iran look really bad on the Arab street, where Iran tried hard to make the Arab Spring look like a logical extension of its own revolution.

Read more. [Image: Khaled al-Hariri/Reuters]

theatlantic
theatlantic:

Senate Committee Approves Use of Force in Syria: 5 Takeaways

The White House push for military intervention in Syria has cleared its first major hurdle — but not with much room to spare.
The Senate Foreign Relations Committee voted 10-7 Wednesday afternoon to approve a resolution that gives the Obama Administration the right to act against Bashar al-Assad’s regime following chemical-weapons attacks. The vote sends the resolution on to the full Senate for another vote, where the smart money seems to be that it will squeak through, and then on to the House, where things are more opaque.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

Senate Committee Approves Use of Force in Syria: 5 Takeaways

The White House push for military intervention in Syria has cleared its first major hurdle — but not with much room to spare.

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee voted 10-7 Wednesday afternoon to approve a resolution that gives the Obama Administration the right to act against Bashar al-Assad’s regime following chemical-weapons attacks. The vote sends the resolution on to the full Senate for another vote, where the smart money seems to be that it will squeak through, and then on to the House, where things are more opaque.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]